Artist and Studio
Edgar Degas, 1903

Edgar Degas, 1903

Edgar Degas, Self-portrait, 1857, Etching and drypoint. MFA, Boston

Edgar Degas, Self-portrait, 1857, Etching and drypoint. MFA, Boston

Edgar Degas

Edgar Degas

Edgar Degas, Manet Seated, Turned to the Left, ca. 1866–68During the 1860s, when Degas was very active as a portraitist, he made his friend Manet the subject of a group of drawings and prints.   MET

Edgar Degas, Manet Seated, Turned to the Left, ca. 1866–68
During the 1860s, when Degas was very active as a portraitist, he made his friend Manet the subject of a group of drawings and prints.   MET

Degas sketchbook, Morgan Library

Degas sketchbook, Morgan Library

Degas self-portrait at home, next to the sculpture of the girl weeping by Bartholomew, 1895.  Photo Musée d’Orsay

Degas self-portrait at home, next to the sculpture of the girl weeping by Bartholomew, 1895.  Photo Musée d’Orsay

Edgar Degas (1834-1917), Portrait of Henri Michel-Levy, c. 1878. Museu Calouste Gulbenkian, Lisbon.
"The subject - the artist in his studio - in this case the painter Henri Michel-Lévy, whom Degas met around 1867, is here given a particularly interesting approach. The mannequin on the floor is mirrored by the figure on the painting The Regattas, to the left of Michel-Lévy – seems to suggest an original interpretation of the relationship between truth and illusion.
Set inside a contained, lonely space, the subject’s off-centre position and unexpected perspective disturb the otherwise rather static work. This unique scene also – perhaps mainly – projects an image of Degas as a lucid, detached and pessimistic observer of daily life.”

Edgar Degas (1834-1917), Portrait of Henri Michel-Levy, c. 1878. Museu Calouste Gulbenkian, Lisbon.

"The subject - the artist in his studio - in this case the painter Henri Michel-Lévy, whom Degas met around 1867, is here given a particularly interesting approach. The mannequin on the floor is mirrored by the figure on the painting The Regattas, to the left of Michel-Lévy – seems to suggest an original interpretation of the relationship between truth and illusion.

Set inside a contained, lonely space, the subject’s off-centre position and unexpected perspective disturb the otherwise rather static work. This unique scene also – perhaps mainly – projects an image of Degas as a lucid, detached and pessimistic observer of daily life.”

Edgar Degas, c. 1860. Photo by Joseph Tourin. Musee d’Orsay

Edgar Degas, c. 1860. Photo by Joseph Tourin. Musee d’Orsay

Edgar Degas by Gustave Moreau, 1859. Musee Gustave Moreau.

Edgar Degas by Gustave Moreau, 1859. Musee Gustave Moreau.

Edgar Degas, Self-Portrait (Autoportrait au chapeau mou), 1857-58

Edgar Degas, Self-Portrait (Autoportrait au chapeau mou), 1857-58

Edgar Degas, Self-Portrait
(not 100% sure this is correct as the source was incorrect about a photograph of Degas. Have not been able to corroborate it elsewhere.)

Edgar Degas, Self-Portrait

(not 100% sure this is correct as the source was incorrect about a photograph of Degas. Have not been able to corroborate it elsewhere.)

Edgar Degas, Portrait of Mary Cassatt

Edgar Degas, Portrait of Mary Cassatt