Artist and Studio
Mark Rothko in his 69th Street studio, ca 1964.   Photo Hans Namuth.

Mark Rothko in his 69th Street studio, ca 1964.   Photo Hans Namuth.

9 abstract expressionist artists

Willem de Kooning, Clyford Still, Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko, Helen Frankenthaler, Robert Motherwell, Frank Stella, Hans Hofmann, Franz Kline

Mark Rothko, 1964.   Photo by Hans Namuth.   National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution

Mark Rothko, 1964. Photo by Hans Namuth. National Portrait Gallery, Smithsonian Institution

Mark Rothko

Mark Rothko

Mark Rothko in his studio, photo by Herbert Matter

Mark Rothko in his studio, photo by Herbert Matter

Mark Rothko, photographed by Sedat Pakay in Rothko’s NYC studio.   Brill Gallery

Mark Rothko, photographed by Sedat Pakay in Rothko’s NYC studio.   Brill Gallery

Milton Avery, Rothko with Pipe, 1936   NGA

Milton Avery, Rothko with Pipe, 1936   NGA

“I would like to say a few words about the greatness of Milton Avery.
This conviction of greatness, the feeling that one was in the presence of great events, was immediate on encountering his work. It was true for many of us who were younger, questioning, and looking for an anchor. This conviction has never faltered. It has persisted, and has been reinforced through the passing decades and the passing fashions.
Avery is first a great poet. His is the poetry of sheer loveliness, of sheer beauty. Thanks to him this kind of poetry has been able to survive in our time.
This-alone-took great courage in a generation which felt that it could be heard only thru clamor, force and a show of power. But Avery had that inner power in which gentleness and silence proved more audible and poignant.
From the beginning there was nothing tentative about Avery. He always had that naturalness, that exactness and that inevitable completeness which can be achieved only by those gifted with magical means, by those born to sing.”
—  Mark Rothko tribute to Milton Avery, 1965 (shortened version; transcribed by Artist & Studio, original at Archives of American Art)
“If you are only moved by color relationships [in my paintings], you are missing the point. I am interested in expressing the big emotions - tragedy, ecstasy, doom.”
—  Mark Rothko (via yama-bato)
Mark Rothko in his West 53rd Street studio, 1952-1953, photograph by Henry Elkan, Smithsonian

Mark Rothko in his West 53rd Street studio, 1952-1953, photograph by Henry Elkan, Smithsonian

Mark Rothko in his 69th Street studio with Rothko Chapel murals, c. 1964.    Photo by Hans Namuth  © Hans Namuth Estate, courtesy Center for Creative Photography, The University of Arizona

Mark Rothko in his 69th Street studio with Rothko Chapel murals, c. 1964.    Photo by Hans Namuth © Hans Namuth Estate, courtesy Center for Creative Photography, The University of Arizona

Mark Rothko, photo by Consuelo Kanaga