Artist and Studio
Dorothea Tanning arrived at the study of Max Ernst, a man 19 years her senior, in 1942. They played chess, traveled together, and eventually were married in a double wedding with Man Ray and Juliet Browner in 1946.

Dorothea Tanning arrived at the study of Max Ernst, a man 19 years her senior, in 1942. They played chess, traveled together, and eventually were married in a double wedding with Man Ray and Juliet Browner in 1946.

Max Ernst by Man Ray, 1934

Max Ernst by Man Ray, 1934

Max Ernst in uniform, c. 1914–1918

Max Ernst in uniform, c. 1914–1918

Max Ernst and his sculptures

Max Ernst and his sculptures

The Paris surrealists, 1933: Tristan Tzara, Paul Éluard, André Breton, Hans Arp, Salvador Dalí, Yves Tanguy, Max Ernst, René Crevel and Man Ray.
Photo by Anna Riwkin-Brick (Riwick took several photographs of the group)

The Paris surrealists, 1933: Tristan Tzara, Paul Éluard, André Breton, Hans Arp, Salvador Dalí, Yves Tanguy, Max Ernst, René Crevel and Man Ray.

Photo by Anna Riwkin-Brick (Riwick took several photographs of the group)

cavetocanvas:

Berenice Abbott, Max Ernst, 1931

cavetocanvas:

Berenice Abbott, Max Ernst, 1931

Max Ernst and Dorothea Tanning

Max Ernst and Dorothea Tanning

hottiesofarthistory:

chapmanmogridge:

Max Ernst and Dorothea Tanning, New York 1947
Photograph by Irving Penn

Wow. Dorothea is particularly fabulous right here.

hottiesofarthistory:

chapmanmogridge:

Max Ernst and Dorothea Tanning, New York 1947

Photograph by Irving Penn

Wow. Dorothea is particularly fabulous right here.

(Source: johnchapmanmogridge)

Man Ray, Surrealist chessboard, 1934, a photomontage integrating portraits of twenty fellow surrealists, including René Magritte, Max Ernst, Salvador Dalí, Giorgio de Chirico, Joan Miró and Man Ray himself.

Man Ray, Surrealist chessboard, 1934, a photomontage integrating portraits of twenty fellow surrealists, including René Magritte, Max Ernst, Salvador Dalí, Giorgio de Chirico, Joan Miró and Man Ray himself.

The cover of the last issue of the Surrealist review, La Révolution surréaliste No. 12, 1929. In the center is Rene Magritte’s The Hidden Woman. The text in the painting reads, “I do not see the (woman) hidden in the forest.”  Surrounding the painting is the inner circle of the Paris Surrealists, all with their eyes closed:  (top row) Maxime Alexandre, Louis Aragon, André Breton, Luis Bunuel, Jean Caupenne; (second row) Salvador Dalì and Paul Éluard; (third row) Max Ernst and Marcel Fourrier; (forth row) Camille Goemans and René Magritte; (bottom row) Paul Nougé, Georges Sadoul, Yves Tanguy, André Thirion, Albert Valentin. [x]

The cover of the last issue of the Surrealist review, La Révolution surréaliste No. 12, 1929. In the center is Rene Magritte’s The Hidden Woman. The text in the painting reads, “I do not see the (woman) hidden in the forest.”  Surrounding the painting is the inner circle of the Paris Surrealists, all with their eyes closed:  (top row) Maxime Alexandre, Louis Aragon, André Breton, Luis Bunuel, Jean Caupenne; (second row) Salvador Dalì and Paul Éluard; (third row) Max Ernst and Marcel Fourrier; (forth row) Camille Goemans and René Magritte; (bottom row) Paul Nougé, Georges Sadoul, Yves Tanguy, André Thirion, Albert Valentin. [x]

Leonora Carrington and Max Ernst
Leonora met Max at a London party in 1937. The artists bonded and returned together to Paris, where Max promptly separated from his wife. The following year they settled in Saint Martin d’Ardèche in the south of France. The new couple collaborated and supported each other’s artistic development.
With the outbreak of World War II, Max was arrested by French authorities and then by the Nazis. He managed to flee to America however with the help of Peggy Guggenheim.  But Leonora, devastated by the events and paralyzed by anxiety and growing delusions suffered a breakdown.
The couple never reconnected.
[Wiki]

Leonora Carrington and Max Ernst

Leonora met Max at a London party in 1937. The artists bonded and returned together to Paris, where Max promptly separated from his wife. The following year they settled in Saint Martin d’Ardèche in the south of France. The new couple collaborated and supported each other’s artistic development.

With the outbreak of World War II, Max was arrested by French authorities and then by the Nazis. He managed to flee to America however with the help of Peggy Guggenheim.  But Leonora, devastated by the events and paralyzed by anxiety and growing delusions suffered a breakdown.

The couple never reconnected.

[Wiki]

Max Ernst,  At the Rendez-vous of Friends,  1922
The Dada movement, 1916 - 1920s.
Seated from left to right: René Crevel, Max Ernst, Dostoievsky, Théodore Fraenkel, Jean Paulhan, Benjamin Péret, Johannes Baargeld, Robert Desnos. Standing: Philippe Soupault, Jean Arp, Max Morise, Raphaël, Paul Éluard, Louis Aragon, André Breton, Giorgio de Chirico, Gala Éluard

Max Ernst,  At the Rendez-vous of Friends,  1922

The Dada movement, 1916 - 1920s.

Seated from left to right: René Crevel, Max Ernst, Dostoievsky, Théodore Fraenkel, Jean Paulhan, Benjamin Péret, Johannes Baargeld, Robert Desnos. Standing: Philippe Soupault, Jean Arp, Max Morise, Raphaël, Paul Éluard, Louis Aragon, André Breton, Giorgio de Chirico, Gala Éluard