Artist and Studio

Picasso and Dora Maar

Poet Paul Eluard introduced Picasso to Dora Maar in the winter of 1935-36. Maar, though only 29, was a successful professional photographer. Picasso, aged 54, was still entangled with his first wife Olga and his mistress of seven years Marie-Therese Walter. With Maar Picasso “had found a union that transcended the physical and emotional, engaging him intellectually. Here was an opinionated, passionate and cerebral woman who moved comfortably within the same literary and artistic cliques as Picasso.”

Around March Maar brought her camera to Picasso’s country house near Gisors where she took photographs of Picasso and the artist “shot his own portraits of the woman who had begun to captivate him. These intimate portraits inspired numerous drawings and paintings that pay homage to Maar.”

After ten years Picasso’s eye began to wander. Dora’s health suffered, leading to a breakdown in the spring of 1945; the couple separated in the summer. Picasso gave Dora a house in Menerbes as a parting gift.  via

Picasso and Marie-Thérèse Walter met by chance on the street while she was shopping at Galeries Lafayette in Paris in 1927. Walter was 17 and he was 45 when they began their eight year secret relationship.  From 1930, Walter lived in a house across the street from Picasso. Marie was the unseen shadow of the family and became his model and muse for both paintings and sculptures.

"Marie-Thérèse was totally unlike the other women in that she was happy to remain hidden in the background, she remained unknown to all but a few of Picasso’s closest friends. She had no social aspirations."  via

In 1935 when Marie became pregnant, Picasso’s wife found out that her husband had a longtime mistress who was expecting a child and she immediately left him. Shortly after their daughter, Maya, was born Picasso met his next muse, Dora Maar.  Marie-Thérèse hanged herself four years after Picasso’s death.

While living on the southern coast of France in early 1954, Picasso encountered 19-year-old Sylvette David. Her stunning features fascinated Picasso so much that over the course of the next three months, he created over forty paintings, drawings and sculptures of her in a range of styles. Her long, fair hair, tied back in a ‘horse’s tail’ was a dominant feature in many of the works.  And this provided the inspiration behind a 1950s ponytail craze. Brigitte Bardot adopted the same hairstyle, apparently after seeing the coverage of David in Paris Match and elsewhere.

David (French, b. 1934) is now herself and artist.   src1

Pablo Picasso, Portrait de Dora Maar Endormie
Maar was a photographer, poet and painter, best known for being a lover and muse of  Picasso.

Pablo Picasso, Portrait de Dora Maar Endormie

Maar was a photographer, poet and painter, best known for being a lover and muse of  Picasso.

Francoise Gilot and Picasso, 1946

Francoise Gilot and Picasso, 1946

bremser:


Olga (Picasso’s wife at the time) in Picasso’s studio, Fontainebleau, France, 1921

bremser:

Olga (Picasso’s wife at the time) in Picasso’s studio, Fontainebleau, France, 1921

Dora Maar, Picasso & Lee Miller 1937.

Dora Maar, Picasso & Lee Miller 1937.

lauramcphee:



Irene Lagut in her studio, Paris, 1922.



"In the spring of 1916, Picasso fell madly in love with Irene Lagut… The affair was on and off until the end of 1916, when they decided to marry. Then at the last minute, when they were going to meet family in Barcelona, she returned to her previous lover in Paris, a woman. It is also said Lagut had been kept by a Russian grand duke in Moscow… She and Picasso became lovers again in 1923 and one of his most famous works, The Lovers (1923), showing a young man and a woman, is, of the couple. src
notes added by Artist  & Studio

lauramcphee:

Irene Lagut in her studio, Paris, 1922.

"In the spring of 1916, Picasso fell madly in love with Irene Lagut… The affair was on and off until the end of 1916, when they decided to marry. Then at the last minute, when they were going to meet family in Barcelona, she returned to her previous lover in Paris, a woman. It is also said Lagut had been kept by a Russian grand duke in Moscow… She and Picasso became lovers again in 1923 and one of his most famous works, The Lovers (1923), showing a young man and a woman, is, of the couple. src

notes added by Artist  & Studio

The important women in Picasso’s life and the years they were together.

Jacqueline Roque 1953-73. In the 20 years they are together Picasso paints over 400 portraits of her.

Françoise Gilot 1944-53,  a young painter when they meet. They have two children together, Claude and Paloma. Gilot’s book Life with Picasso (1964) was the subject of the film, Surviving Picasso.

Dora Maar 1936-44, a Surrealist artist and photographer.  She published a memoir in 1993, Picasso and Me.

Marie-Therese Walter 1927-36,  is only seventeen when she meets Picasso. She becomes his model and lover. Picasso is still married to Olga so the relationship is kept secret at first. She is the mother of Maia (b. 1935). Marie-Thérèse hanged herself four years after Picasso’s death.

Olga Kholkhlova 1917-35, a Russian ballerina. They marry in 1918 and their son Paulo is born in 1921. Olga introduces Picasso to the world of high society which he later rejects.

Marcelle (Eva) Humbert 1911-15, Picasso tattoos her name onto his Cubist pictures. There affair ends when she dies in 1915.

Fernande Olivier 1905-11, a bohemian artist who became his mistress.  Olivier appears in many of his Rose period paintings.

laflaneuse8:


Pablo Picasso and Jacqueline Roque dancing in front of Bañistas en La Garoupe, 1957. Photo by David Douglas Duncan

laflaneuse8:

Pablo Picasso and Jacqueline Roque dancing in front of Bañistas en La Garoupe, 1957. Photo by David Douglas Duncan

(Source: anneyhall)