Artist and Studio
Damien Hirst, Arse Hole :  “The self-portrait which was painted by one of Hirst’s many assistants is part of the Hirst ‘Arse Series’ where he depicts himself as the contemporary ‘anal bullshit’ con-artist that he is. “I aim to paint myself as limitless angular momentum in constant toilet flushing flux. My anal sphincter muscles loosen and expel hydrostatic equilibrium into the anus-sphere of existence and of course stick a dead fucking cow in there too,” Hirst writes in Arthole magazine.   link

Damien Hirst, Arse Hole :  “The self-portrait which was painted by one of Hirst’s many assistants is part of the Hirst ‘Arse Series’ where he depicts himself as the contemporary ‘anal bullshit’ con-artist that he is. “I aim to paint myself as limitless angular momentum in constant toilet flushing flux. My anal sphincter muscles loosen and expel hydrostatic equilibrium into the anus-sphere of existence and of course stick a dead fucking cow in there too,” Hirst writes in Arthole magazine.   link

7 contemporary African American artists

Mark Bradford, Lorna Simpson, Sam Gilliam, Ellen Gallagher, Patrick Earl Hammie, Louis Delsarte and Michael Ray Charles

sfmoma:

Did you know that both Jasper Johns and Jay DeFeo were included in an exhibition at MoMA The Museum of Modern Art in 1959?LISTEN → our latest Artcast episode considers the exhibitions that have brought both artists’ work together under the same roof. Image: Burt Glinn, Jay DeFeo working on “The Rose,” 1960; ©2012 Burt Glinn/Magnum Photos

sfmoma:

Did you know that both Jasper Johns and Jay DeFeo were included in an exhibition at MoMA The Museum of Modern Art in 1959?

LISTEN → our latest Artcast episode considers the exhibitions that have brought both artists’ work together under the same roof. 

Image: Burt Glinn, Jay DeFeo working on “The Rose,” 1960; ©2012 Burt Glinn/Magnum Photos

Camille Claudel (1864-1943) “was one of the rare female artists of the 19th century that could and did compete with the best male sculptors of her time.”

In 1883, Camille became acquainted with Auguste Rodin when he took over  instruction of her class at the Académie Colarossi. Soon after Camille became his model, assistant and lover. “No other woman had such an intellectual, artistic and erotic impact on Rodin’s life like Camille Claudel.”

In 1892, after an abortion, Claudel ended the intimate aspect of her relationship with Rodin, although they saw each other regularly until 1898.

After 1905 Claudel appeared to be mentally ill. She destroyed many of her statues and was diagnosed as having schizophrenia. She accused Rodin of stealing her ideas and of leading a conspiracy to kill her. In 1913 after her father died her brother had her committed to a mental hospital. Over the years the hospital requested numerous times Claudel be sent home but her family refused. She remained institutionalized until her death in 1943.  src1 & scr2

David Walker painting

David Walker painting

Alexander Calder’s ‘Mailbox’, 1963.   Photo  by Pedro Guerrero.  Smithsonian

Alexander Calder’s ‘Mailbox’, 1963.   Photo  by Pedro Guerrero.

Smithsonian
George Kersting (German, 1785-1847), Caspar Friedrich in his Studio, 1811

George Kersting (German, 1785-1847), Caspar Friedrich in his Studio, 1811

Robert Indiana at his Coenties Slip Studio, NYC with ”Year of Meteors” (1961) in background, 1963.   Photo by William John Kennedy.

Robert Indiana at his Coenties Slip Studio, NYC with ”Year of Meteors” (1961) in background, 1963.   Photo by William John Kennedy.

Paul Cézanne (1839-1906), Self-Portrait in a Straw Hat, 1875-76. MoMA

Paul Cézanne (1839-1906), Self-Portrait in a Straw Hat, 1875-76. MoMA

Jars in the Pollock Krasner house.
For photos and an interactive video of Pollock’s studio see the Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center in East Hampton, New York.

Jars in the Pollock Krasner house.

For photos and an interactive video of Pollock’s studio see the Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center in East Hampton, New York.

While living on the southern coast of France in early 1954, Picasso encountered 19-year-old Sylvette David. Her stunning features fascinated Picasso so much that over the course of the next three months, he created over forty paintings, drawings and sculptures of her in a range of styles. Her long, fair hair, tied back in a ‘horse’s tail’ was a dominant feature in many of the works.  And this provided the inspiration behind a 1950s ponytail craze. Brigitte Bardot adopted the same hairstyle, apparently after seeing the coverage of David in Paris Match and elsewhere.

David (French, b. 1934) is now herself and artist.   src1