Artist and Studio
Willem de Kooning Certificate of Naturalization, 1961, from the National Archives. de Kooning’s application showed he was 5’ 5” and 145 lbs.

Willem de Kooning Certificate of Naturalization, 1961, from the National Archives. de Kooning’s application showed he was 5’ 5” and 145 lbs.

Die Malweiber, 1900.
Women in Germany with artistic ambitions, mostly middle class, were denied admission to the painting schools so they formed their own groups. ‘Malweiber’ was a derogatory term applied to these fearless women.

Die Malweiber, 1900.

Women in Germany with artistic ambitions, mostly middle class, were denied admission to the painting schools so they formed their own groups. ‘Malweiber’ was a derogatory term applied to these fearless women.

Duchamp playing chess against IBM’s computer.   via  (actually a photo-manipulation, Duchamp didn’t really play the computer)
"By 1923, Marcel Duchamp (1887-1968) had established himself as a singular force in the avant-garde art communities on both sides of the Atlantic. Then, suddenly, after two decades of unparalleled innovation and considerable controversy, he was reported to have quit making art in order to focus on his new passion: chess. Of course, Duchamp never quit being an artist; he was, however, thoroughly engaged in a radical redefinition of art that favored-much like chess-a more conceptual approach.
Following a brief excursion to Buenos Aires during 1918 and 1919, where he became a self-described “chess maniac,” his interest in the game grew far beyond an idle pastime. He soon made it his objective to win the French Chess Championship. Between 1923 and 1933, chess dominated Duchamp’s life as he competed in tournaments across Europe. Following several respectable performances, including a first-place finish at the Chess Championship of Haute Normandie in 1924, he was awarded the title of Chess Master by the French Chess Federation.”   SLUMA

Duchamp playing chess against IBM’s computer.   via  (actually a photo-manipulation, Duchamp didn’t really play the computer)

"By 1923, Marcel Duchamp (1887-1968) had established himself as a singular force in the avant-garde art communities on both sides of the Atlantic. Then, suddenly, after two decades of unparalleled innovation and considerable controversy, he was reported to have quit making art in order to focus on his new passion: chess. Of course, Duchamp never quit being an artist; he was, however, thoroughly engaged in a radical redefinition of art that favored-much like chess-a more conceptual approach.

Following a brief excursion to Buenos Aires during 1918 and 1919, where he became a self-described “chess maniac,” his interest in the game grew far beyond an idle pastime. He soon made it his objective to win the French Chess Championship. Between 1923 and 1933, chess dominated Duchamp’s life as he competed in tournaments across Europe. Following several respectable performances, including a first-place finish at the Chess Championship of Haute Normandie in 1924, he was awarded the title of Chess Master by the French Chess Federation.”   SLUMA

Cafe du Dome, Paris, 1920s.   (via)
One reason for the influx of artists to Paris at that time was that it was ridiculously affordable, especially for Americans. According to James Hinkle, “The exchange rate for French francs was about twenty-five francs to the dollar. One dollar had approximately forty times its present purchasing power. Hemingway paid 250 francs a month (about ten dollars) for his Paris apartment…For a franc, you could buy breakfast of a brioche and coffee or a drink at a first-class bar. A full dinner with wine at a decent restaurant could be had for five francs—about a quarter. e.e. cummings lived in Paris and traveled for two years on $1,000. Faulkner managed for several months on a dollar a day.”   (via)

Cafe du Dome, Paris, 1920s.   (via)

One reason for the influx of artists to Paris at that time was that it was ridiculously affordable, especially for Americans. According to James Hinkle, “The exchange rate for French francs was about twenty-five francs to the dollar. One dollar had approximately forty times its present purchasing power. Hemingway paid 250 francs a month (about ten dollars) for his Paris apartment…For a franc, you could buy breakfast of a brioche and coffee or a drink at a first-class bar. A full dinner with wine at a decent restaurant could be had for five francs—about a quarter. e.e. cummings lived in Paris and traveled for two years on $1,000. Faulkner managed for several months on a dollar a day.”   (via)