Artist and Studio

Camille Claudel (1864-1943) “was one of the rare female artists of the 19th century that could and did compete with the best male sculptors of her time.”

In 1883, Camille became acquainted with Auguste Rodin when he took over  instruction of her class at the Académie Colarossi. Soon after Camille became his model, assistant and lover. “No other woman had such an intellectual, artistic and erotic impact on Rodin’s life like Camille Claudel.”

In 1892, after an abortion, Claudel ended the intimate aspect of her relationship with Rodin, although they saw each other regularly until 1898.

After 1905 Claudel appeared to be mentally ill. She destroyed many of her statues and was diagnosed as having schizophrenia. She accused Rodin of stealing her ideas and of leading a conspiracy to kill her. In 1913 after her father died her brother had her committed to a mental hospital. Over the years the hospital requested numerous times Claudel be sent home but her family refused. She remained institutionalized until her death in 1943.  src1 & scr2

Lynn Christopher’s sculpture sudtio

Lynn Christopher’s sculpture sudtio

Charles Parks studio, Wilmington, Delaware

Charles Parks studio, Wilmington, Delaware

Will Kurtz

photos by Maria Teicher

Philip Martiny (French-American, 1858 – 1927), c. 1892

Philip Martiny (French-American, 1858 – 1927), c. 1892

Charles Parks studio

Charles Parks studio

stilllifequickheart:

Arthur George Walker, Cedar Studios, 1932

stilllifequickheart:

Arthur George Walker, Cedar Studios, 1932